Haut
Bas

Observing

The essential guide to astronomy
  1. Jupiter and Saturn rise in twilight this week. Mars is a fire-beacon high in the southeast by the beginning of dawn. Venus, low as dawn begins to brighten, passes just 1° from Aldebaran on Saturday and Sunday mornings July 11th and 12th.

    The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, July 10 – 18 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  2. Skywatchers are treated to a naked-eye comet as NEOWISE emerges into the the dawn sky.

    The post Comet NEOWISE Delights at Dawn appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  3. Two bright new supernovae — 2020nlb in M85 and 2020nvb in NGC 4457 — are now within the range of amateur telescopes in the western sky at nightfall.

    The post Two Bright Supernovae Light Up Nearby Galaxies appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  4. This is the time of year when the two brightest stars of summer, Arcturus and Vega, are equally high overhead at dusk. Arcturus is toward the southwest, Vega is toward the east.

    Arcturus and Vega are 37 and 25 light-years away, respectively. They represent the two commonest types of naked-eye stars: a yellow-orange K giant and a white A main-sequence star. They're 150 and 50 times brighter than the Sun, respectively — which, combined with their nearness, is why they dominate the high evening sky.

    The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, July 3 – 11 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  5. Two comets spark excitement for the coming week — NEOWISE might reach naked-eye visibility at dawn, while Lemmon will be visible in binoculars at dusk.

    The post Anticipation Grows for Comets NEOWISE and Lemmon appeared first on Sky & Telescope.