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Sky at the glance

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  1. By 8 or 9 p.m. the Big Dipper stands on its handle in the northeast. In the northwest, Cassiopeia stands on end at about the same height.

    The post This Week’s Sky at a Glance, February 14 – 22 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  2. Venus is the bright "star" shining in the southwest during and after twilight. Fainter Mercury is far down to its lower left as twilight fades.

    The post This Week’s Sky at a Glance, February 7 – 15 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  3. Betelgeuse remains dim. The red supergiant Betelgeuse in Orion's shoulder has always been slightly variable, but for the last month or so it's been in an unusually low dip. Now magnitude 1.6!

    The post This Week’s Sky at a Glance, Jan. 31 – Feb. 8 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  4. Betelgeuse remains dim. The red supergiant Betelgeuse in Orion's shoulder has always been slightly variable, but for the last month or so it's been in an unusually low dip. As of January 22nd it was still about visual magnitude +1.5 instead of its more typical +0.5, It's clearly fainter than similarly-colored Aldebaran, magnitude +0.9, with which it's often compared and normally outshines quite obviously.

    The post This Week’s Sky at a Glance, Jan. 24 – Feb. 1 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  5. Is your sky dark enough for you to see the winter Milky Way? In mid-evening now it runs vertically up and across the zenith: from Canis Major low in the southeast, up between Orion and Gemini, through Auriga and Perseus almost straight overhead, and down through Cassiopeia, Cepheus, and Cygnus to the northwest horizon.

    The post This Week’s Sky at a Glance, January 17 – 25 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.